Posted tagged ‘Holocene’

Remarkably extensive glaciation in Turkey near the Pleistocene-Holocene boundary

December 26, 2011

A new paper was published in GSA’s Journal of Geology by Zreda and others in November 2011. This is their media paragraph published in the journal’s web site: “Looking at how climate changed in the geological past can provide a useful perspective for studying modern climate change and for predicting climate changes in the next century. Dr Marek Zreda of the University of Arizona and his colleagues used mountain moraines to reconstruct the former glaciers and to determine climatic changes in Turkey at the beginning of the Holocene, the current interglacial epoch. They found that the glaciers were unusually large for that time, with snow lines lower than today by more than 1400 meters, implying a temperature 9°C lower than modern long-term average temperature. The main glacier melting phase lasted 500 years during which the ice margin retreated at the average rate of 1700 m per century, which is higher than modern gracier retreat rates computed over comparable time. This corresponds to the temperature increase at the rate of 1.4°C per century, which exceeds the global warming trend of the past century, 0.6°C, showing that natural causes can lead to fast and large climate changes, and that the magnitude and the rate of climate change observed in the past century are not unprecedented.” Please see more details and the paper here doi:10.1130/G32097.1

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Holocene climate change in central Turkey

December 25, 2011

Last 6000 years climate record from Tecer Lake in central Turkey were published in Holoceneby Kuzucuoğlu et al. According to the mineralogy and grain-size distribution of lake sediments, during the mid-Holocene transition, intense droughts occured at the end of the sixth, fifth and fourth millennia BP. The characteristics of some climatic phases at Tecer seem specific to the location of the sequence which, when compared with other sites in the eastern Mediterranean, may record variations in the extent of different climatic systems. Please refer to doi: 10.1177/0959683610384163